Visit to Mississippi School for Math and Science, August 2014

A vis­it to my high school board­ing school, with some of the dri­ve between Nashville and Columbus.

Photo Exploration: The Lost Fashion Shoot

I had worked with Bone­yard Cloth­ing in ear­ly 2012, and loved every­thing they did. When anoth­er oppor­tu­ni­ty came up in May 2012, I was thrilled for a stu­dio shoot.

It was lots of fun with a vari­ety of looks among three mod­els, and I was excit­ed to get BYC the work. I slipped the mem­o­ry card in my bag and went home to process the pho­tos. And at home, I opened the bag and looked for the card. And looked, and looked, and looked. And pan­icked. I had nev­er phys­i­cal­ly lost a card before (and haven’t since), and was­n’t real­ly sure what to do. I did the only thing I could do — call BYC, apol­o­gize, and accept that I had let them down.

Until this past week.

Bone Yard Clothing, May 2012

 

As I was dig­ging around in a long-repur­posed bag for some­thing else, I felt what could be a mem­o­ry card. Lo and behold, there was a lit­tle sleeve inside a zip­pered pock­et. When exam­ined, it was the lost card! I was great­ly relieved to get the ses­sion back (although two years late) and was sur­prised at how much my style has changed, at least in what I was tak­ing for the major­i­ty of the shots. Although my per­son­al favorite picks from that ses­sion are still (rough­ly) in line with what I would shoot today, I liked see­ing a lit­tle bit of pro­gres­sion here and there.

My sen­ti­men­tal­i­ty gauge is pret­ty unbal­anced with this work, as I believed for years that it was com­plete­ly gone. The redis­cov­ery of these images has been a great boon, not least of which for the free­dom that I see in the work. There are many ele­ments in much of the rest of the series that I would be sure to clean up now in the stu­dio rather than in post, and even in the above I see a few bits that I would try and adjust in the moment. But isn’t that a lit­tle bit of what makes nos­tal­gia nos­tal­gic? That we can’t go back and relive the past, but we can at least learn and laugh a lit­tle at the experience?

Thanks to Bone­yard Cloth­ing for set­ting up the shoot, and Justin of The Go Dev­ils for being the mod­el in the above photograph.

Brittany, June 2011.

I worked with Brit­tany as part of my Back series in 2011. She mod­eled for a cou­ple of ses­sions, in dig­i­tal and film.

I recent­ly found the instant film set and res­canned the work. I’m still blown away by the tonal­i­ty of the “print” in these scans. Using the FP-3000b offers a high speed expe­ri­ence that is real­ly unique, and I hope to con­tin­ue using the media for a long long time.

Photo Exploration: Military Street, Hamilton Alabama. August 2014

When you dri­ve down the road on a sun­ny day, some­times you have a cam­era in hand and it’s set­up for 1/500 sec expo­sure. Maybe man­u­al­ly set­up for f/11 and hyper­fo­cal convergence. Burn­ing through a few frames, or more. And there is one shot, maybe, when it is worth stop­ping. But where on earth are you? Film does­n’t give you much by way of coor­di­nates. If you’re lucky, you can remem­ber the most recent town, or some­thing unique about where you turned around to trace back a quar­ter mile to find that shot.

Military Road, Hamilton Alabama

This pho­to was made ear­ly August of 2014 on a dri­ve from Nashville to Colum­bus, MS. It was only after I devel­oped the film that I real­ized I was­n’t real­ly all that sure where I had been. It cer­tain­ly was­n’t going to come up in a search for Tex­a­co sta­tions between the two points.

Grate­ful­ly there are plen­ty of ways to trace one’s steps. Work­ing back­wards from the end of my dri­ve, look­ing at a Google Maps satel­lite view along High­way 17 in Alaba­ma, I was able to find where the above was tak­en. 34.170103, ‑87.962499. The street view is from Decem­ber 2013, and you can see the branch­es bare. The tree seems much more frag­ile then, as if it could be ripped out of the ground with­out effort. But in the sum­mer, it seems that with­in a few years the entire loca­tion will be one mass of green.

It was occu­pied at least since 1989, when System3 gaso­line was intro­duced. And prob­a­bly much more recent­ly than that. My guess is that it was dam­aged in 2011, pos­si­bly relat­ed to the EF5 twister that in that area. This is a snap­shot of a moment of tran­si­tion. I feel the bal­ance very pre­car­i­ous­ly in this spot. Will we come to clean our mess? And, fur­ther, will we come to clean the mess that we were hand­ed by nature, in a way? Or will we let nature take back what was claimed by storms?

I felt like a tourist there. I was no more invest­ed in this space than I am when I vis­it ancient won­ders. I admire those who built it, and I even more so, in some ways, admire those who knew to walk away. “Yes we are OPEN” — was that left as a bit of jest? As a state­ment say­ing we will be back? It is like those places aban­doned mid-meal, when some ter­ror or need was so great that all was left behind with hope of return­ing, but maybe know­ing in some sliv­er that no one would be com­ing back. And now it is cap­tured in film, in this state of tran­si­tion, forever.

 

[EDIT: Oth­ers have not­ed that the EF5 tor­na­do passed a few miles north of the ser­vice sta­tion. So, dam­age is prob­a­bly not from the tor­na­do itself but I would still guess from the relat­ed storm]

Movement at the Sideshow Fringe, August 2014

Move­ment pho­tog­ra­phy at the 2014 Sideshow Fringe Fes­ti­val. Beau­ti­ful per­for­mances with the FALL dance com­pa­ny and Aer­i­al Fab­ri­ca­tors.

Thank you to Jes­si­ka Mal­one and the entire Sideshow Fringe team for invit­ing me to be part of the event this year!