Nashville Tornado Aftermath

April 3, 2020 at 5:02 pm

Franklin in the rain, February 2020

March 10, 2020 at 4:52 pm

Early Morning in Blue Ridge, Georgia

May 3, 2017 at 7:28 am

Blue Ridge Geor­gia. April 2017. Mamiya Pro TL, Ilford FP4+.

TN 134 Railroad Bridge, April 2017

April 21, 2017 at 8:15 pm

Run­ning Water Tres­tle over TN 134 and I-24.


April 2017, expired 220 roll of FP4+ with Mamiya 645 Pro TL.

San Francisco, June 2016

August 28, 2016 at 4:49 pm

San Fran­cisco, June 2016. Ilford FP4+ and HP5+ in Leica M3

Vancouver on Film, May 2015

May 28, 2015 at 12:21 am

A week in Van­cou­ver with a roll of Velvia 120 and FP4+ 35mm is about perfection.

Mostly play­ing tourist and not too much explo­ration, but even that was reward­ing. Stan­ley Park is phe­nom­e­nal, Gas­town is great fun, and ran­dom side streets were well worth investigating.

On the tech­ni­cal side, I shot the Velvia with my Mamiya 645 Pro TL with the 45, 80 and 150mm lenses. I don’t shoot that cam­era too much these days - I have been work­ing with the GA645 more often for medium for­mat film. When I to man­age to set aside the time and energy to show the Pro TL, the results are amaz­ing. Espe­cially with slide film, look­ing at the actual media in real life is a treat. Not to men­tion the sheer size of the raw amount of data com­ing from the 6x45 negatives!

This was also the first trip with my Leica M3 and while I am not as quick with the focus­ing as I am with my A-1, I am com­ing along with the rest of the process. Even hav­ing to meter with an exter­nal meter on this trip for it, I still was able to shoot rea­son­ably quickly when the time came. And the look of the images I really love, espe­cially on those pho­tos with a large amount of fine detail and contrast.

A great trip, really wel­com­ing city and who knows? Maybe one day we’ll call it home.

Photo Exploration: Cabin Wall with Guitar Strings, June 2014.

July 23, 2014 at 12:00 pm

Since I first started play­ing gui­tar I had wound my strings into a lit­tle round object as they came off for new strings. It was really more a func­tion of keep­ing the strings in place as they came off the instru­ment and not lay­ing around haphazardly.

But over time I started to really love the cir­cu­lar shape and I tried to put a lit­tle inten­tion in how I wrapped the strings. I cer­tainly am not the first (or ten thou­sandth) to do so, but I did really like the way they looked. Espe­cially the older strings when I was lax on chang­ing them. Their worn down feel was beau­ti­ful when woven together — all the dif­fer­ent thick­nesses and mate­r­ial in and out, with enough nat­ural flex and resis­tance to man­ual posi­tion­ing that each set of strings was a lit­tle unique.

At Kanuga this past June, the time came to change strings on site. I’d been delib­er­at­ing on tak­ing a photo of the cabin wall by itself, but I real­ized that what I really needed was to make a photo of the strings on the wall. The con­trast of the organic wall with the two nails (which have been there since who knows when) and the metal cir­cles all came together very well in a late after­noon long expo­sure (I believe it was 2 sec­onds at f/11).

Cabin Wall with Guitar Strings. June 2014. FP4+ 120 film.

Cabin Wall with Gui­tar Strings. June 2014. FP4+ 120 film.

I am grate­ful of my his­tory at Kanuga. I’ve been going there twenty years this sum­mer, and it con­tin­ues to be as for­ma­tive then as it was that first year. I’ve almost always stayed in the #30–36 cab­ins and the tex­tured green walls are as famil­iar as my own skin. I’m pleased with this image, as a remem­brance of a quiet time and place in the midst of a hec­tic life.

Using the cam­era as a tool to record a staged event is of mixed regards, and the ten­sion of still life vs more “street” or “organic” com­po­si­tions still goes back and forth in my own aes­thetic. How­ever, I do believe that it is pos­si­ble to cre­ate a clearer state­ment of place and/or time by lay­er­ing objects delib­er­ately and then record­ing that con­tent than by wait­ing and hop­ing to chance upon arrange­ments that speak the same. If we are to have clar­ity of our mem­o­ries and our rec­ol­lec­tions, we must be able to express those same through what­ever tools we have available.

Now, an inter­est­ing step fur­ther is that I left the strings there on the wall. If another pho­tog­ra­pher was to come onto the porch and see those strings and make an image, they would have the oppo­site rea­son­ing for doing so — their record­ing of a found for­ma­tion as opposed to my inten­tional cre­ation. Would they feel any con­nec­tion to my work? Would their prints be at all related to mine of the same scene? Maybe next time I visit Kanuga they will still be there and I can inves­ti­gate, at least con­trast­ing my own estab­lish­ing vs find­ing work.

French Broad Chocolate Lounge, Asheville. June 2014.

July 3, 2014 at 3:11 pm

We had an extended visit to West­ern North Car­olina in June, and one of the stops was the always fan­tas­tic French Broad Choco­late Lounge. Great cof­fee, great treats.

Shot with the Mamiya 645 Pro TL and expired FP4+ 220 film.